Event Types

Presentation on the Lindsay Wildlife Museum

Check out Lindsay’s magazine, Wildlife Wonders!

Lindsay Wildlife Experience saves animals lives, teaches and inspires children and adults through up-close-and personal encounters with live wild animals, and strengthens the connection between people and the natural world.

Lindsay Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital is one of the oldest and largest rehabilitation centers in the United States. Our team of veterinarians, staff, and volunteers treats more than 5,600 injured and orphaned wild animals each year. The hospital is a pioneer in wildlife rehabilitation. Because wildlife does not have medical insurance, the hospital relies on donations to provide this life-saving work.

Our education programs and interactive exhibit hall create meaningful opportunities to learn about the natural world and live in harmony with wildlife. Listen to the cry of a red-tailed hawk, go eye-to-eye with an opossum and watch a great horned owl eat lunch. More than 50 species of live, non-releasable, native California animals are on exhibit. Only when we understand these wild creatures can we prevent more patients from being admitted to our wildlife rehabilitation hospital.

More than 500 volunteers help feed and care for wild animals, teach children and adults about nature, and support Lindsay’s mission in many other ways.

Jul 12, 2018
Jul 14, 2018
6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Jul 17, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

The Last Mile (TLM) was created to provide programs that result in successful reentry and reduce recidivism. We believe that  jobs are the key to breaking the cycle of incarceration. Our mission is to provide marketable skills that lead to employment. Our in and out program provides career training in prison with mentorship and job placement upon release.

TLM began as an intensive 6-month entrepreneurship program at San Quentin, in which men learned how to tap into their passion to create a business that includes a technology component and social cause. At Demo Day in front of 350 invited guests from the business community and fellow inmates, they pitch their ideas. Many say it’s the best day of their life.

Through the process, they learn how businesses function, how to work with a team, accept criticism, gain confidence in their ability to grasp new ideas, and pivot when they are heading down the wrong path. With the help of volunteers, guest speakers, and leaders from the business community, they are introduced to the latest technology without access to the internet or hands on experience.

 

 In 2014, TLM launched the first computer coding curriculum in a United States prison (Code.7370), in partnership with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and CalPIA. The men learn HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and Python. In addition to these front end skills, the curriculum will expand to include web and logo design, data visualization and UX/UI.

Since Internet access is not allowed in prison,  programs are taught without connectivity. To overcome this challenge we created a proprietary programming platform that simulates a live coding experience. Imagine, software engineers who are judged by the quality of the code they develop, not by the stigma of criminality.

It is predicted that there will be a shortfall of 1 million software engineering jobs in 2020. The TLM “returned graduates” will be positioned well to leverage this opportunity and support our mission to reduce recidivism by attaining gainful employment.

In 2016 we launched TLMWorks web development shop inside San Quentin to employ graduates as software engineers.

Jul 19, 2018

Valley Humane Society

Our Mission:
To provide a safe haven for unwanted or abandoned pets in Pinal County, to return lost pets to their rightful owners, to place animals in loving adoptive homes and prevent the overpopulation of dogs and cats through spay and neuter programs.

Overview:
Valley Humane Society is a private, non-profit 501c(3) organization which accepts nearly 1,000 unwanted pets each year. VHS pets come to us from owners who can no longer care for them and from area Animal Control Agencies.

Why We Need You:
Many impounded animals in city and county shelters often have only three to ten days in which they are available for adoption, while VHS animals may be sheltered for many months. VHS is a no-kill shelter. Located on three acres, the VHS shelter cares for up to 50 dogs and 30 cats at a time.  Each year VHS needs a minimum of $140,000 to provide these animals with food, housing, health care, and protection from cruelty and other dangers.

However, unlike the city and county shelters, VHS receives absolutely no public funding from any government source or from any other animal welfare organization, national or local. The shelter survives solely on donations. Share in our vision that healthy companion animals should not be put to death for lack of a home, lack of shelter space, or lack of compassion. Please consider volunteering, donating, and/or adopting a pet from Valley Humane Society.


Aug 02, 2018
Aug 21, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Sep 18, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Oct 16, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Nov 20, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM
Dec 18, 2018
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM